Tag Archives: database administration

SQL Saturday NEW YORK CITY? Get a rope!

This weekend I will be speaking at SQL Saturday New York City. My last time here was two years ago for the last SQL Saturday here and I had a great time. If you are in the area come on out for some awesome speakers and a great day of learning!

Anyone remember this? No? Just me, huh? Ok.

Blogging reboot and PowerShell – Get System Information

After whining about not blogging enough, I am going to do something about this. Whether it is PowerShell or SQL, simple or complex, I know that others can benefit from my knowledge and expand their skill sets.

And you are like “That’s great Amy…where’s the PowerShell we are here for?” Ok, Ok….keep your drawers on! πŸ˜‰

Recently I was tasked with gathering the system information from all of the servers at a client. Another opportunity for some PowerShell dominance.

With this script you can generate system information files and save them to a specified location. It makes sure a connection can be made to the server first, and then outputs the file. The files are created one at a time, so if you pass in a longer list of servers, you shouldn’t crash your machine. From my testing, this will take some time to run as these files don’t output quickly. Despite that, the output is worth it. This can be modified to pull your list of servers from a file or from a Central Management Server (CMS) instance.

Hope you find this useful. Happy PowerShellin’ πŸ™‚

Podcast with SQL Data Partners

Recently I had the pleasure of meeting Carlos Chacon with SQL Data Partners and found out he had a podcast (I know…I live under a rock…with cats). He asked if I was interested in being on said podcast – ummmm…yes, please! Click here (Episode 33) if you wanna go listen to the podcast or here if they get all up in your grill about streaming stuff at the office and you wanna just read the transcript. Thanks to Carlos for the opportunity! Enjoy! πŸ™‚

Code Upload – Pragmatic Works webinar

For those that attended my webinar last week with Pragmatic Works I have uploaded the code…finally. For what it is worth, the weekend was busy and I was working on my SQL PASS Summit submissions. Then, just as I was getting this together on Monday night, I was not feeling right and realized I was making mistakes and that is no good. Tried to go to work on Tuesday but even they knew something was wrong with me. Went home and found out later my nephew was also sick. No need for any further details. Just trying to get better. Thanks for your patience. πŸ™‚

 

The lovely people at Pragmatic Works sent me some of your questions from the webinar. Without further adieu…

Do you have a suggestion for BEGINNERS learning books to get a basic understanding of PS??

Great question! While I have a TON of books on all kinds of things (SQL Server, C#, web dev stuff, etc.) I do not have a single book on Powershell. How did I accomplish all this then? Simple – using this pesky thing we call the internet. I have also attended some great Powershell sessions at SQL Saturday events.

Did they leave any beer bottles?

The roofers? Thankfully no.

Do not criticize the king of soda pop, Dr. Pepper!

Preach it!

When will VBScript stop functioning for SQL Server or Windows Server. As in will there be a total switch?

VBScript? Hmmmm…great question. No clue. This might be a Microsoft cockroach. Like replication.

why we need a PS-Drive – why we can just use an arraay directly?

You mean passing in the server name from the array to the Invoke-SqlCmd? Yeah, you could do that. That’s just not how I wrote this. πŸ™‚

what is her email again?

Leave a comment here if you would like to email me and I will get back to you.

does the ( $servers | Measure-Object).count syntax do?

That counts the number of items in the array.

What is the purpose of the New-PSDrive?

New-PSDrive is a method of connecting to a SQL Server instance. Another method would be to declare a connection with SMO (Server Management Objects).

Does it work on windows 2003 as well?

I have not tested this against Windows Server 2003.

so, ps-drive is the equivalent of object explorer in SSMS?

Well, kinda. Maybe. More the equivalent of browsing a drive in a cmd.exe window.

what city in Austin?

Ummmm….Austin is a city.

What permission you require on AD for this excercise

To make the AD changes, I have no clue. Not my area and I also intentionally created the Azure VM so I could make all the changes I needed to without worrying about a silly thing like permissions. As far as reading from AD (which is the main Powershell script for this part) I am not sure about this either but I am assuming you need some level of read permissions (which is all that script is doing).

There are some things where I may tend to run something, and if anyone says anything, ask forgiveness later. Security is pretty tight where I am – I have gotten dinged on xp_cmdshell but so far nothing on reading from AD. If for some reason you can’t run anything against AD, I would find the person over that and find out why, and let them know what you are trying to do.

Thanks again to everyone who attended. If you have any other questions leave a comment. πŸ™‚

3/12 – Webinar : Beginning Automation with Powershell

Anything I can do to reduce the time I have to spend dealing with otherwise time-sucking tasks gives me a happy. Currently, where I am, I have reduced our daily deployment process to a single Powershell cmdlet with a log file review. All the steps that normally went into each deployment (applying SQL scripts, data updates, updating the TFS task, sending an email that the deployment is done) are handled by Powershell, and the process accepts multiple deployments at the same time. As long as there are no errors in the log file for a deployment, there is nothing more to do. There’s an error? Run the same cmdlet with the rollback option.

I am still working on improving this process, from trying to get the error handling to work the way I want it to, to incorporating the automation of check-in to source control of the changes that were just applied. It is a work-in-progress that will continue to reduce the amount of time spent on what would otherwise be manual tasks.

This work led me to the idea for a session on Powershell and automation of processes. Join me and Pragmatic Works on Thursday, March 12th from the comfort of your own desk at 11am EST/10am CST for Beginning Automation with Powershell. This demo-heavy session will go over some different Powershell cmdlets and automation concepts that you can take and build upon in your own environment. Powershell is a tool that no DBA should work without. A development background is helpful but not necessary – what DBA would not want to spend a few hours writing code for a process that will save them from having to do a repetitive manual task over and over again? Automation frees up time for us to do other projects that we want to spend time on and grow our skill sets.

Have questions about this? Leave a comment below. See y’all there. πŸ™‚

Have you tried restarting your computer SQL Server?

Everyone at one point or another has had this experience – you have to call technical support for assistance with your operating system or an application and get posed with the question “Have you tried restarting your computer?”

“Ummm…yeah. I did that. I also power-cycled my modem, searched the internet, hacked the registry and walked counter clockwise around my chair three times. I just thought I would call you to chat.”

Anyways…

Occasionally, the same logic is what is needed to resolve issues with SQL Server – restarting the SQL Server service. While we want to think that being on a fairly up-to-date version of SQL Server means things like this don’t happen, this is still software written by humans and every possible situation cannot be accounted for in testing. Sometimes you might find documentation that this is needed. Other times, the solution to the issue you are trying to solve is not as clear.

A couple of examples of a documented situation would be when updates to the server require a reboot or when a known issue in SQL Server is able to be immediately resolved by a restart of the service. Undocumented situations that can arise from different situations can range from changes to server settings that are not taking effect to changes in database mail. I have seen both of these situations in the past year – a server setting change was affecting replication (resolved by a restart) and database mail changes not taking effect, causing mail not to be sent and the mail queue to become backed up (another lesson learned here – after the restart of the service all those messages in the queue will be sent; if you don’t want this to happen the queue needs to be cleared out prior to restart).

Unlike rebooting a computer, restarting this service (or the server itself) is typically something that is done only where the circumstances dictate that it is required. Outside of this, restarting SQL Server is typically done as a last resort and is the last thing that the DBA might think to do. Depending on the server and the processes that communicate with the SQL Server instance, the business other resources may need to be not only notified of the restart, but also why it is needed in the first place. This is made more difficult by the fact that it may be unclear whether or not the restart will solve the problem at hand.

While it might not be documented that certain changes may require a service restart, that doesn’t mean that they don’t, and those situations can be difficult to identify. In these cases, all reasonable measures had been taken without yielding the desired results. Both cases involved changes to a SQL Server instance. Making the decision to restart in cases like this is not something that should be done flippantly, but where do you draw the line at time and effort spent before pulling the trigger? My experience with these issues will dictate how I handle similar cases going forward, but as for resolving issues that I have not had experience in dealing with yet, there very well may be more painful times…followed by sound of my head hitting the desk over and over out of frustration that the solution was something so simple.

SQL Saturday #324 – I’m headed South!

It is just a few more days until SQL Saturday #324 – Baton Rouge. I will be giving two sessions there – Making the Leap from Developer to DBA and Beginning Automation with Powershell. So looking forward to this event!

The last time I was in southern Louisiana I was barely in my 20’s and on a family vacation. I found that my normal routine for straightening my natural curls was no match for theΒ level of humidity in New Orleans. This memory prompted me to check the weather for this weekend – yeah…this could get interesting.

See everyone there! πŸ™‚

I’m Speaking – SQL Saturday #308

SQLSAT308_SPEAKING

This weekend will be my second time to speak at a SQL Saturday event, and the first time I will be doing it solo. Being a native Texan, I have to admit it is a little strange that I have never been to Houston before, but I cannot think of a more fitting reason to make the drive down there. There is also that whole Dallas vs. Houston thing….but that is an unrelated post that I think other sites have already covered ad nauseam.

My session this weekend will be on Making the Leap from Developer to DBA – a topic I am all too familiar with since I have lived it. Fulfillment of that desire to innovate and create things can be accomplished as a DBA, but that is only a small part of the role. The business depends on you to make sure data is accurate and available in a timely fashion. Developers depend on you for the same thing but also for things like deploying their code…and trying to prevent them from hanging themselves and you when you do it.

It is still not too late to sign up for the event. If you are in Texas or anywhere near Houston you should go…and come to my session. Hope to see you there. πŸ™‚

Kill Oracle Sessions With PoSH

Recently I have been tasked with taking over the database related tasks for an Oracle database that is the backend for a third party application. Two of the monthly processes require the all the user sessions connecting to the application be killed before hand. Straight forward enough…there are just a lot of sessions.

Last time I did this I had forgotten that I had this task and on the day of I was not prepared with any type of automation. As a result, I was killing off connections by hand. Yes, there was sadness with each arrow up and the changing of the SID and SERIAL# values.

Moving on, I knew I wanted to automate this with powershell so I did some searching and came across thisΒ article on querying Oracle with PS. I walked each of the segments, modifying the code for our environment and for my needs. Everything was going great…until I decided to run the code in production. There was more sadness –

Once I was done cursing and swearing I started to research the error. Our pre-prod and production environments should be the same. After some digging I found some small differences in the listener.ora files and thought this might be the clue I was looking for.

Cut to Monday moring – a quick chat with our Oracle person (read: the guy on our team that has Oracle training…training that I do not have) brings me my solution – something far more simple than I had imagined. Since the production server was set up with a different port than the one Oracle defaults to all I needed to do was include that with the server reference in my connection string. Duh!

I began testing in the UAT environment and uncovered one small issue – a semi-colon in my kill statement that was not needed and causing my code to fail. Once that was removed everything looked good with the exception of getting error messages when trying to kill a session related to a system process (there weren’t that many sessions to begin with here, not to mention, it didn’t matter if I broke anything on this server).

Feedback is welcome. Hoping you find this helpful. πŸ™‚